ANTAKYA-SAMANDAG CULTURE TOUR

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20 (per person)
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History of Antakya, Turkey Antakya’s 2000+-year history is among the most eventful, brilliant and tragic in a region where such histories are commonplace. Seleucus I Nicator (321-281), successor to the empire of Alexander the Great, laid out a plan for this city about 300 BC. It became the capital of the Seleucid Empire stretching from...
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History of Antakya, Turkey

Antakya’s 2000+-year history is among the most eventful, brilliant and tragic in a region where such histories are commonplace.

Seleucus I Nicator (321-281), successor to the empire of Alexander the Great, laid out a plan for this city about 300 BC. It became the capital of the Seleucid Empire stretching from Macedonia nearly to India.

The empire facilitated trade, and Antioch became an important point on the Silk Road, with caravans of luxury goods bringing fabulous wealth and a scandalously sybaritic lifestyle. Remnants of this can be seen at Daphne (Harbiye). More…

Under the Romans, Antioch-ad-Orontes was the capital of the province of Syria with a population around 500,000. It became one of the empire’s greatest cities—only Rome and Alexandria were greater—with a considerable Jewish community.

Saint Peter came here to preach, and Saints Paul and Barnabas used it as their base for missionary work. Converts from the local Jewish community were many, but it was here that the saints decided to expand their mission to Gentiles as well, calling their followers Christians.

Antioch flourished under the Byzantines until in the 500s a violent earthquakeruined it, killing 200,000 people. Later overrun by the Persians, then the Arabs (700s) and the Seljuk Turks (1084), it regained importance under the Crusaders(1098) as the capital of their Principality of Antioch, but conquest by the Mamelukes in 1268 saw its utter destruction.

What the Ottomans claimed in 1516 was only a shadow of its former self, and it later declined to just a village.

After the collapse of the Ottoman Empire following World War I, Ottoman Syria, including Antakya, was placed under French Mandate government. By a plebiscite in 1939 it was returned to Turkey along with the entire Sanjak of Alexandretta, the province now called Hatay.

 

ANTAKYA-SAMANDAG CULTURE TOUR

Prices for

3 people $ 345.-

4 people $ 370.-

5 people $ 395.-

Mercedes Vito is for  maximum  6  people so please  do not forget children.

-Depart

-St.Peter Church

A little outside the city is the holy site where St. Peter’s Grotto is situated. The cave church is the place where St. Peter preached and founded the Christian community. It was declared as a holy place by Vatican in 1983. The Iron Gate of Antioch is to the south of the grotto among the ruins of the city. One can sense these far off times since little has changed since that time. The Castle of Antioch will give you a panoramic view over the city.

Antakya Archeology Museum

The Hatay Archaeology Museum (Turkish: Hatay Arkeoloji Müzesi) is the archaeology museum of Hatay Province, Turkey. It is known for its extensive collection of Roman and Byzantine Era mosaics. The museum is located in Antakya, the main city of Hatay.

-Catholic Church
The Italian-ministered Roman Catholic Church was built in 1846 and occupies two houses in the city’s old quarter,
with the chapel in the former living room of one house dating only from the 1970s.

Orthodox Church

Orthodox Church in Hatay (Antakya). This town was known as Antioch in antiquity. Turkey

-Harbiye and Lunch

Harbiye (Daphne), located 7 kilometres from Antakya, is a popular excursion and picnic area – a virtual paradise thick with greenery and blessed with abundant water. According to legend, this is the spot where Apollo caught sight of Daphne, a beautiful nymph, and fell in love with her. When he tried to approach her however, she fled and Apollo began to pursue her. Realizing that there was no escape, she prayed to the Mother Earth, begging for her protection and she was transformed into a laurel tree just as Apollo reached her. Ever after, a crown of laurel leaves was used to award excellence in poetry and military prowess. Daphne’s tears are said to be still flowing over the waterfalls of Harbiye. The Turkish word for laurel is defne, whose origin of course is the nymph’s name. The essential oils of this tree are used in making the famous laurel soap (defne sabunu), which is completely natural and is highly recommended for healthfulness.

-Titus Tunnel

The Vespasianus Titus Tunnel is a 2,000-year-old engineering marvel – a massive tunnel dug through a mountain that was built to divert the floodwaters threatening the harbour near the ancient city of Seleuceia Pieria in what is now Turkey.  According to UNESCO, it is one of the most magnificent remains of the Roman period because of its size, well-preserved authenticity, and architectural and engineering features.

-St.Simeon  Monastery 

Saint Simeon was born in 386 AD in the Amanus mountains village. … After the burial, Saint Simeon’s grave in Antioch became a revered site for the pilgrimage, and so, did his pillar on the hill where he spent few decades of his life as a holy place for worshiping God.

 

-Habib-I Neccar Mosque

Habib-I Neccar Mosque is the oldest mosque in Turkey, It was built in 636 AD.The present minaret was added in the 17th century. Habib-I Neccar means “my beloved carpenter”. The carpenter to whom the mosque is dedicated was killed by pagans whilst trying to protect two disciples sent to Antioch by Jesus. Visitors are welcome inside the mosque and admission is free.

-Tour Ends

 

 

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